Legend to identify Patrol Medallions

Download Checklist

BASE FABRICS:

Braid: A complex structure or pattern formed by interlacing three or more strands of flexible material such as textile yarns to foam a flat, solid, three-stranded structure.

Red Felt: A cloth made without weaving (a non-woven) which is produced by matting, condensing and pressing fibers together. To create felt, hot water is applied to layers of wool fibers, while repeated agitation and compression causes the fibers to hook together or weave together into a single piece of fabric. Wrapping the properly arranged fiber in a sturdy, textured material, such as a bamboo mat or burlap, will speed up the felting process. The felted material may be finished by fulling.

Red Broadcloth: A twilled napped woolen tightly woven fabric. The cloth is tightly woven before being dipped in water while being stretched on tenters, special racks that keep up the tension in the fabric. The water causes the wool to shrink when it is pulled out to dry. Next, the cloth is rubbed with fullers earth, and beaten with a wooden hammer. The result is a soft, almost felted cloth that is supple, smooth, and very soft. While wool is the traditional material for this fabric, cotton varieties are also manufactured.

Twill Coarseness: A type of textile weave with a pattern of diagonal parallel ribs. This is done by passing the weft thread over one or more warp threads then under two or more warp threads and so on, with a "step," or offset, between rows to create the characteristic diagonal pattern. The coarseness is determined by two factors: Thread diameter primarily, and secondarily the number of warp threads under the warp threads.

Twill Back: Term used to describe twill when an embroider embroiders the emblem on the technical back. The front side of the twill is called the technical face and the back the technical back. The technical face side of a twill weave fabric is the side with the most pronounced wale; it is usually more durable and more attractive. The term used to describe when an embroider embroiders the emblem on the technical back.

Twill Right: Term used to describe twill when the wale angle of the twill is to the right.

Twill Left: Term used to describe twill when the wale angle of the twill is to the left.

BORDER TYPES:

Cut Edge: The edge of the cloth is a raw or unfinished. This type of border is usually the result of the patch being die cut from a large piece of fabric.

Merrowed Edge: Threads wrapped around the fabric edge yielding a uniform border. The term merrowed comes from the inventor of the bordering machine, Joseph Makens Merrow. THe type of merrowed edge depends on the typo/model of the machine used by the embroider. There are three types used on patrol medallion.

Narrow Merrowed Edge:Standard Merrowed EdgeFlat Merrowed Edge:


Lockstitch Type:

Matching Lockstitch: The color of the border thread and the color of the border lockstitch thread are the same.Contrasting Lockstitch: The color of the border thread and the color of the border lockstitch thread are contrasting colors.Monofilament Lockstitch: The lockstitch is a clear monofilament. This is the same a monofilament fishing line.